Matvei Petrovich Bronstein and Soviet Theoretical Physics in the Thirties (Science Networks : Historical Studies, Vol 12) by G. E. Gorelik

Page Updated:
Book Views: 63

Author
G. E. Gorelik
Publisher
Date of release
Pages
0
ISBN
9780817627522
Binding
Illustrations
Format
PDF, EPUB, MOBI, TXT, DOC
Rating
5
57

Advertising

Get eBOOK
Matvei Petrovich Bronstein and Soviet Theoretical Physics in the Thirties (Science Networks : Historical Studies, Vol 12)

Find and Download Book

Click one of share button to proceed download:
Choose server for download:
Download
Get It!
File size:3 mb
Estimated time:5 min
If not downloading or you getting an error:
  • Try another server.
  • Try to reload page — press F5 on keyboard.
  • Clear browser cache.
  • Clear browser cookies.
  • Try other browser.
  • If you still getting an error — please contact us and we will fix this error ASAP.
Sorry for inconvenience!
For authors or copyright holders
Amazon Affiliate

Go to Removal form

Leave a comment

Book review

The true history of physics can only be read in the life stories of those who made its progress possible. Matvei Bronstein was one of those for whom the vast territory of theoretical physics was as familiar as his own home: he worked in cosmology, nuclear physics, gravitation, semiconductors, atmospheric physics, quantum electrodynamics, astro­ physics and the relativistic quantum theory. Everyone who knew him was struck by his wide knowledge, far beyond the limits of his trade. This partly explains why his life was closely intertwined with the social, historical and scientific context of his time. One might doubt that during his short life Bronstein could have made truly weighty contributions to science and have become, in a sense, a symbol of his time. Unlike mathematicians and poets, physicists reach the peak of their careers after the age of thirty. His thirty years of life, however, proved enough to secure him a place in the Greater Soviet Encyclopedia. In 1967, in describing the first generation of physicists educated after the 1917 revolution, Igor Tamm referred to Bronstein as "an exceptionally brilliant and promising" theoretician [268].


Readers reviews